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Beach Award Deadline: Sept 15 | WC Young Award Dealine: Oct 1

The Frank Beach Award submission deadline is September 15. The deadline for the WC Young Award is October 1. See the Awards menu for more info.
New Book Authored by Michael Numan

The Neurobiology of Social Behavior presents a comprehensive and multilevel analysis of the neural regulation of prosocial and antisocial behaviors in mammals, including humans.

Welcome from the President

SBN President Cheryl Sisk.

Welcome to the website of the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology (SBN). Since 1996, the SBN has been promoting intellectual exchanges between scientists who have interests in the interactions of the nervous system and the endocrine system on behavior and in the influences of behavior and the environment on neuroendocrine systems. We are an inclusive society with a very diverse membership. Our members are interested in quite an array of behaviors – reproductive behavior, parental behaviors, social behaviors, eating and drinking, responses to stressors, learning and memory, aggression and more, as well as mental health. We are interested in a wide range of species, from simple organisms, like c. elegans to humans and everything in between. We are interested in interactions at the molecular, cellular, and organismic/behavioral level of investigation. We work in laboratories, as well as in the field. Many of our members study natural behaviors, which in turn shed light on behavioral disorders, which often have strong neuroendocrine components. This rich mixture of ideas and approaches can be seen in the Society’s journal, Hormones and Behavior , and can be enjoyed at our vibrant, annual meetings.

Upcoming Meetings

Become a Member of the SBN

The Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology offers four levels of eligibility for prospective members: Regular, Emeritus, Student, or Associate Memberships.

To see which membership class you qualify for, please review the membership eligibility requirements.

For additional information on SBN and the rules of membership, please see the SBN Bylaws.

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Elected Officers

PRESIDENT (2013-2015) Cheryl Sisk

PRESIDENT-ELECT (2013-2015) Elizabeth Adkins-Regan

PAST PRESIDENT (2013-2015) Jeffrey Blaustein

SECRETARY (2013-2015) Zuoxin Wang

TREASURER (2013-2016) Nancy Forger

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Hormones and Behavior

Monday, September 01, 2014
Publication date: July 2014
Source:Hormones and Behavior, Volume 66, Issue 2

Author(s): Belinda Pletzer , Ourania Petasis , Larry Cahill

Sex differences in attentional selection of global and local components of stimuli have been hypothesized to underlie sex differences in cognitive strategy choice. A Navon figure paradigm was employed in 32 men, 41 naturally cycling women (22 follicular, 19 luteal) and 19 users of oral contraceptives (OCs) containing first to third generation progestins in their active pill phase. Participants were first asked to detect targets at any level (divided attention) and then at either the global or the local level only (focused attention). In the focused attention condition, luteal women showed reduced global advantage (i.e. faster responses to global vs. local targets) compared to men, follicular women and OC users. Accordingly, global advantage during the focused attention condition related significantly positively to testosterone levels and significantly negatively to progesterone, but not estradiol levels in a multiple regression model including all naturally cycling women and men. Interference (i.e. delayed rejection of stimuli displaying targets at the non-attended level) was significantly enhanced in OC users as compared to naturally cycling women and related positively to testosterone levels in all naturally cycling women and men. Remarkably, when analyzed separately for each group, the relationship of testosterone to global advantage and interference was reversed in women during their luteal phase as opposed to men and women during their follicular phase. As global processing is lateralized to the right and local processing to the left hemisphere, we speculate that these effects stem from a testosterone-mediated enhancement of right-hemisphere functioning as well as progesterone-mediated inter-hemispheric decoupling.

Monday, September 01, 2014
Publication date: June 2014
Source:Hormones and Behavior, Volume 66, Issue 1

Author(s): Francis J.P. Ebling

This article is part of a Special Issue “Energy Balance”. Seasonal cycles of adiposity and body weight reflecting changes in both food intake and energy expenditure are the norm in mammals that have evolved in temperate and polar habitats. Innate circannual rhythmicity and direct responses to the annual change in photoperiod combine to ensure that behavior and energy metabolism are regulated in anticipation of altered energetic demands such as the energetically costly processes of hibernation, migration, and lactation. In the last decade, major progress has been made into identifying the central mechanisms that underlie these profound long-term changes in behavior and physiology. Surprisingly they are distinct from the peptidergic and aminergic systems in the hypothalamus that have been identified in studies of the laboratory mouse and rat and implicated in timing meal intervals and in short-term responses to caloric restriction. Comparative studies across rodents, ungulates and birds reveal that tanycytes embedded in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle play a critical role in seasonal changes because they regulate the local availability of thyroid hormone. Understanding how this altered hormonal environment might regulate neurogenesis and plasticity in the hypothalamus should provide new insight into development of strategies to manage appetite and body weight.

Monday, September 01, 2014
Publication date: June 2014
Source:Hormones and Behavior, Volume 66, Issue 1

Author(s): Jill E. Schneider , Jeremy M. Brozek , Erin Keen-Rhinehart

This article is part of a Special Issue “Energy Balance”. The prevalence of adult obesity has risen markedly in the last quarter of the 20th century and has not been reversed in this century. Less well known is the fact that obesity prevalence has risen in domestic, laboratory, and feral animals, suggesting that all of these species have been exposed to obesogenic factors present in the environment. This review emphasizes interactions among three biological processes known to influence energy balance: Sexual differentiation, endocrine disruption, and maternal programming. Sexual dimorphisms include differences between males and females in body weight, adiposity, adipose tissue distribution, ingestive behavior, and the underlying neural circuits. These sexual dimorphisms are controlled by sex chromosomes, hormones that masculinize or feminize adult body weight during perinatal development, and hormones that act during later periods of development, such as puberty. Endocrine disruptors are natural and synthetic molecules that attenuate or block normal hormonal action during these same developmental periods. A growing body of research documents effects of endocrine disruptors on the differentiation of adipocytes and the central nervous system circuits that control food intake, energy expenditure, and adipose tissue storage. In parallel, interest has grown in epigenetic influences, including maternal programming, the process by which the mother's experience has permanent effects on energy-balancing traits in the offspring. This review highlights the points at which maternal programming, sexual differentiation, and endocrine disruption might dovetail to influence global changes in energy balancing traits.

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